List of strategy consulting firms in Hong Kong 2011

List of strategy consulting firms in Hong Kong

  1. Accenture
  2. Alvarez & Marsal
  3. Applied Value Group
  4. A.T. Kearney
  5. Bain & Company
  6. Booz & Company
  7. Boston Consulting Group
  8. Deloitte Consulting
  9. Forum Corporation
  10. Global Intelligence Alliance
  11. Hay Group
  12. Hill & Knowlton
  13. IMS Health
  14. Kurt Salmon Associates
  15. Lippincott
  16. McKinsey & Company
  17. Monitor Group
  18. Navigant Consulting
  19. OC&C Strategy Consultants
  20. Oliver Wyman
  21. Roland Berger Strategy Consultants
  22. Seabury Group
  23. Value Partners Management Consulting

1. Accenture

Website: www.accenture.com

Address:

Accenture
85/F International Commerce Centre
1 Austin Road West
Kowloon
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2249 2388

Established in 1989, Accenture operates in more than 120 countries worldwide.

Accenture is a global management consulting, technology services and outsourcing company.

2. Alvarez & Marsal

Website: www.alvarezandmarsal.com

Address:

Alvarez & Marsal
11/F MassMutual Tower
38 Gloucester Road
Wanchai
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 3102 2600

Founded in 1983, A&M operates in 38 cities worldwide.

A&M is an independent global professional services firm which provides leadership, problem-solving and value-creation services to companies across the industry spectrum.

3. Applied Value Group

Website: www.appliedvaluegroup.com

Address:

Applied Value Group
Yuen Kee International Building
3 Queen Victoria Street, 1/F
Central
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2868 0014

Applied Value has offices in Stockholm, Shanghai, New York, London, Hong Kong, Detroit, and Boston.

Applied Value offers strategy, finance, and operations management services.

4. A.T. Kearney

Website: www.atkearney.com

Address: 

A.T. Kearney (Hong Kong) Ltd.
Room 1301, 13/F MassMutual Tower
38 Gloucester Road
Wanchai
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2501 1400

Founded in 1926, A.T. Kearney operates across 55 locations world wide.

A.T. Kearney’s mission is to help the world’s leading corporations gain and sustain a competitive advantage, and to achieve profound, tangible results for its clients. Services offered include: complexity management, enterprise transformation, operations, procurement solutions, strategic information technology, strategy and sustainability.

5. Bain & Company

Website: www.bain.com

Address: 

Bain & Company (Hong Kong)
30/F, One International Finance Centre
1 Harbour View Street
Central
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2978 8800

Founded in 1973 when Bill Bain and others left BCG to form Bain & Company. Bain operates in 47 offices across 30 countries.

Bain is well-known for offering services like due diligence, IPO preparation, portfolio profit improvement and revenue enhancement geared toward leveraged buyout and venture capital firms.

6. Booz & Company

Website: www.booz.com

Address: 

Booz & Company
Unit 17, Level 18, Wheelock House
20 Pedder Street
Central
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 3650 6100

Founded in Chicago in 1914 by Edwin G. Booz, Booz & Co broke away from Booz Allen Hamilton in 2008. The company operates in 62 offices across six continents.

Booz & Co has its main area of expertise in strategy and technology consulting, working in the commercial sector.

7. BCG

Website: www.bcg.com

Address:

The Boston Consulting Group
34th Floor, Tower Two
Times Square
Causeway Bay
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2506 2111

Founded in 1963 by Bruce Henderson, BCG operates in 72 offices worldwide.

BCG specialises in business strategy and draws most of its clients from the 500 largest corporations worldwide, as well as working with smaller companies, non-profit organizations and government agencies.

8. Deloitte Consulting

Website: www.deloitte.com

Address: 35/F, One Pacific Place, 88 Queensway, Hong Kong

Deloitte
35/F, One Pacific Place
88 Queensway
Admiralty
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2852 1600

Founded as an accountancy office in London in 1845, Deloitte has member firms in nearly 140 countries worldwide.

“Deloitte” is the brand under which a collection of independent firms collaborate globally to provide audit, consulting, financial advisory, risk management, and tax services.

9. Forum Corporation

Website: www.forum.com

Address:

Forum Asia-Pacific – Hong Kong
23/F China Online Centre
333 Lockhart Road
Wanchai
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 3966 7288

Founded in 1971, Forum operates in 10 countries worldwide.

Forum helps senior leaders execute innovative, people-driven solutions that accelerate business growth, corporate change and overall performance.

10. Global Intelligence Alliance

Website: www.globalintelligence.com

Address:

Global Intelligence Alliance Hong Kong
88 Hing Fat Street, Unit 1902
Causeway Bay
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2107 4299

GIA has 11 offices worldwide.

GIA provides strategic market intelligence and advisory services anywhere around the world.

11. Hay Group

Website: www.haygroup.com

Address:

Hay Group
27/F, 3 Lockhart Road
Wanchai
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2527 9797

Founded in 1943 by visionary Edward N. Hay, Hay Group operates in 84 offices across 48 countries.

Hay Group is a global management consulting firm that works with leaders to transform strategy into reality.

12. Hill & Knowlton

Website: www.hillandknowlton.com

Address:

Hill & Knowlton Asia Headquarters
36th Floor, PCCW Tower, Taikoo Place
979 Kings Road
Quarry Bay
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2894 6321

Founded in 1927, Hill & Knowlton is headquartered in New York and has 80 offices in 44 countries worldwide.

Hill & Knowlton is a leading international communications consultancy, providing services to local, multinational and global clients.

13. IMS Health

Website: www.imshealth.com

Address:

IMS Hong Kong, ChinaMetrik Ltd.
16/F, 80 Gloucester Road
Wan Chai
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2581 1802

Founded in 1954, IMS is headquartered in Connecticut andhas 86 offices worldwide.

IMS is the leading provider of information services for the healthcare industry. Services offered are grouped into 3 categories: healthcare measurement, analytics & services, and consulting.

14. Kurt Salmon Associates

Website: www.kurtsalmon.com

Address:

Kurt Salmon Associates
99 Queen’s Road
66/F, The Center
Central
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 3960 6448

Formed by the merger of Kurt Salmon Associates and Ineum Consulting, Kurt Salmon has offices in 15 countries across five continents.

Kurt Salmon is a global management consultancy.

15. Lippincott

Website: www.lippincott.com

Address:

Lippincott
26th Floor Central Plaza
18 Harbour Road
Wanchai
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2301 7552

Founded in 1943 as Lippincott & Margulies, Lippincott has offices in Boston, Hong Kong, London, New York and Paris.

Lippincott crafts authentic brand stories and memorable experiences that transform perception, enrich connections and drive change.

16. McKinsey & Company

Website: www.mckinsey.com

Address:

McKinsey & Company
40 Floor, ICBC Tower
3 Garden Road
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2868 1188

Founded in Chicago in 1926 and operating in Hong Kong since 1985, McKinsey is the world’s most prestigious consulting firm and operates in 101 locations worldwide.

McKinsey is a global management consulting firm, and trusted advisor to the world’s leading businesses, governments, and institutions.

17. Monitor Group

Website: www.monitor.com

Address:

Monitor Group Hong Kong Limited
Suite 219, 2/F, Shui On Centre
6-8 Harbour Road
Wanchai
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2824 8322

Founded in 1983 by six entrepreneurs, including Harvard’s Michael Porter, Mark Fuller and Joseph Fuller, Monitor operates in 17 countries worldwide.

Monitor works with organizations to help them grow.  For corporations, that often means developing strategies for revenue growth. For governments, it means working on national economic development. For non-profits, it means helping to grow their social impact.  Monitor addresses all the problems that are involved in growth: strategy, marketing, pricing, innovation, product development, organization, leadership, economic competitiveness.

18. Navigant Consulting

Website: www.navigant.com

Address:

Navigant Consulting
108 Gloucester Road, Dah Sing
Financial Centre, Suites 2901-2904, 29th Floor
Wanchai
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2233 2500

Navigant is headquartered in Chicago, Illinois and has offices throughout the world, including core offices in London, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, and Washington, DC.

Navigant has industry expertise in Energy, Healthcare, Construction and Financial Services, and has significant technical expertise in Disputes & Investigations, Economics, Financial Advisory and Management Consulting.

19. OC&C Strategy Consultants

Website: www.occstrategy.com

Address:

OC&C Strategy Consultants
18/F Fu Fai Centre
27 Hillier Street
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2201 1700

Founded in 1987, OC&C Strategy Consultants has 11 offices worldwide.

OC&C helps clients across a wide range of industries find a creative, practical and actionable solutions to the challenges they face.

20. Oliver Wyman

Website: www.oliverwyman.com

Address:

Oliver Wyman
26th Central Plaza
18 Harbour Road
Wanchai
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2506 0767

Formed through a long list of mergers since 1970, Oliver Wyman operates in 50+ cities across 25 countries.

Oliver Wyman is a leading global management consulting firm that combines deep industry knowledge with specialized expertise in strategy, operations, risk management, organizational transformation, and leadership development.

21. Roland Berger Strategy Consultants

Website: www.rolandberger.com

Address:

Roland Berger Strategy Consultants
16/F, Nexxus Building
41 Connaught Road
Central
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 3757 9480

Founded in 1967, Roland Berger has offices in 31 countries.

Roland Berger is one of the world’s leading strategy consultancies. Its expertise includes branding, corporate finance, corporate responsibility, financial & risk effectiveness, IT, manufacturing, marketing, organization, real estate management, research and development, restructuring, sales, strategy, and supply chain management.

22. Seabury Group

Website: www.seaburygroup.com

Address:

Seabury Group
9/F, Somptuex Central
52-54 Wellington Street
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 9836 1556

Seabury Group has 10 offices worldwide.

Seabury Group is a global advisory and investment management group providing investment banking, restructuring, management consulting, IT development, and human capital advisory services.

23. Value Partners Management Consulting

Website: www.valuepartners.com

Address:

Spectrum Value Partners
1402 Harcourt House
39 Gloucester Road
Wan Chai
Hong Kong

Tel: +852 2103 1000

Founded in 1993, Value Partners Management Consulting has offices in 9 countries worldwide.

Value Partners has turnaround and change management expertise working with industrial and service multinationals.

Rule of Three – five final thoughts

Successful businesses use the Rule of Three to help them drive sales or raise awareness 

PREVIOUS posts looked at the Rule of Three, how you can improve your speeches with the Rule of Three, and a few amusing examples of where the Rule of Three has been used in comedy, storytelling, and the movies.

This post provides five final thoughts on the Rule of Three (think of it as three final thoughts, plus a bonus two).

Please find below examples of the Rule of Three used in marketing, politics, religion, science and sports.

1. Marketing

People like to be presented with three choices rather than say, two or five. Successful businesses use this innate human preference to help them drive sales or raise awareness.  Here are three examples:

  1. McDonalds offers three value meals: small, medium or large.
  2. Heinz baked beans uses the slogan: “Beanz Meanz Heinz” (three words).
  3. The Cancer Council of Victoria ran an effective skin cancer prevention campaign: “Slip, Slop, Slap – Slip on a shirt, Slop on some sunscreen, Slap on a hat.”

2. Politics

The power embedded in the Rule of Three has been used by governments and rulers since ancient times.  Here are three examples:

  1. Julius Caesar: “Veni, Vidi, Vici” – “I came, I saw, I conquered.”
  2. National motto of France: “Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité.”
  3. Nazi slogan: “Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Führer!” – “One People, One Nation, One Leader!”

3. Religion

The major religions understand how to communicate effectively and often use the Rule of Three to great effect.  Here are three examples from the Christian faith:

  1. Birth and death of Jesus: The baby Jesus received three gifts from the wise men: gold, frankincense and myrrh. Jesus rose from dead on the third day.
  2. New Testament, Corinthians 13:13: “Meanwhile these three remain: faith, hope and love; and the greatest of these is love.”
  3. The nature of God: Christian theology identifies God as the Holy Trinity, one God in three persons – Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit.

Bonus

1. Science

The Rule of Three is also used in science:

  1. Solid, Liquid and Gas.
  2. Electron, Proton and Neutron.
  3. Negative, Positive and Zero.

2. Sports

And even in sports:

  1. Olympic medals: Gold, Silver and Bronze.
  2. Olympic motto: “Citius, Altius, Fortius” – “Faster, Higher, Stronger”.
  3. On Your Marks, Get Set, Go.

3. Adieu, adieu

To you and you and you!

The Three-Question Rule

“I Can’t Stand to Be Asked the Same Question Three Times” ~ Mustafa

Part 1: The Rule of Three
Part 2: Improve Your Speech Writing with The Rule of Three
Part 3: The Three Question-Rule

THE PREVIOUS two parts looked at The Rule of Three and how you can improve your speeches with The Rule of Three.

You can use the Rule of Three not just to improve your speech writing, and report writing, but in pretty much every aspect of your life.

For your amusement and edification, please find below examples of the Rule of Three used in comedy, storytelling, and the movies.

1. Comedy

The Rule of Three is used to great effect in comedy because it fits the classic joke structure of set-up, anticipation and punchline. A “triple” is a joke consisting of three statements in which the first two statements follow the same pattern, and the third statement provides an unexpected twist. The amusement results from the mismatch between what we expected and what we get. 
Here are three examples:

  1. French joke: “I know three French words: Bonjour, merci, and surrender.”;
  2. Jon Stewart from The Daily Show: “I celebrated Thanksgiving in an old-fashioned way. I invited everyone in my neighborhood to my house, we had an enormous feast, and then I killed them and took their land.”; and
  3. Benjamin Disraeli: “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.”

2. Storytelling

The Rule of Three is commonly used in storytelling, so much so that it is unusual to find a fairy tale that does not incorporate the Rule of Three: Three Little Pigs, Three Billy Goats Gruff, and Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Here are 3 more examples:

  1. Charles Dickens´ A Christmas Carol: Scrooge receives a visit from three spirits: The Ghost of Christmas Past, The Ghost of Christmas Present, and The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come;
  2. Rumpelstiltskin: An impish creature spins gold from straw three times and gives the queen three days to guess his name; and
  3. Aladdin: The genie of the lamp grants three wishes to an impoverished young street dweller.

3. Movies

You also see the Rule of Three used in the movies. The three act structure is widely used in screenwriting because it is a proven formula. Stephen J. Cannell, an American writer, producer and director, is quoted as having said that, “Every great movie, book or play that has stood the test of time has a solid Three-Act structure.”

The Rule of Three has also been used to create memorable movie titles:

  1. Sex, Lies and Videotape (1989);
  2. Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998); and
  3. The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly (1966).

Improve Your Speech Writing with The Rule of Three

The Rule of Three can make you more persuasive, memorable and entertaining

Part 1: The Rule of Three
Part 2: Improve Your Speech Writing with The Rule of Three
Part 3: The Three Question-Rule

EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION is a skill like any other, and the Rule of Three is a simple tool that you can start using immediately to improve your speeches, reports and other communications.

1. Importance

Have you ever listened to an uninspired speech, read a forgettable report, or watched a boring TV advertisement? Thousands of hours, millions of dollars and inestimable amounts of emotional labour were spent preparing these messages; messages which did not inspire, were not memorable and have not changed you for the better (or worse).

When you communicate, you should aim to change your audience in some way: inform them, inspire them, or amuse them. Creating a message with no such impact is much like digging a hole and then filling it in again, a complete waste of time.

Would you like to make an impact, push the world forwards a little, and shake things up? If not, then you needn’t read any further – you might as well spare yourself the effort and go build sandcastles at the beach with all of the other children… but if you would like to change things, the Rule of Three is a simple technique that you can use to help you make your communications more persuasive, memorable and entertaining.

Steve Jobs has used the Rule of Three in all of his presentations dating back to the 1970s.

2. Improve your Speech Writing

You can use the Rule of Three to structure your next speech.

The outline of an effective speech will have three sections: an introduction, body and conclusion. You probably knew this already because this is the same way that we were taught to structure an essay in high school. What you may not have realised is that this structure is based on the Rule of Three: introduction, body and conclusion. The repetition is powerful because it can make your message more persuasive, memorable and entertaining.

Your core message can also be backed with three points. There is something powerful in the way that the Rule of Three allows you to introduce your message, emphasise it, and then make it memorable. If you have more than three supporting points then you can just use your top three. Fewer than 3 points will not give you quite the same amount of punch, and more than 3 risks putting your audience to sleep.

Using the Rule of Three to organise your speech outline and supporting points will give you a speech structure that looks something like this:

  1. Introduction
  2. Body:
    • Point 1 (e.g. give a supporting point or tell a story that illustrates your point)
    • Point 2
    • Point 3
  3. Conclusion

This is such a simple, elegant and effective structure, and you can use it to structure your next speech.

The Rule of Three can also be used at the micro-speech level to create memorable triads of words, phrases and sentences. This technique has been used in famous speeches throughout history. Here are three examples:

  1. Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar: Mark Antony begins his famous speech with “Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me your ears.”
  2. James Lowther, 1st Viscount Ullswater: “There are three golden rules for Parliamentary speakers: Stand up. Speak up. Shut up.”
  3. Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address: Lincoln uses a number of triads in the Gettysburg Address: “We can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground”; “government of the people, by the people, for the people.”

3. Conclusion

You can use the Rule of Three to help you create speeches with impact. The outline of your speech can be broken into three sections; each of your core messages can be supported by three points; you can also compose memorable triads of words, phrases and sentences.

The Rule of Three

Omne Trium Perfectum – everything that comes in threes is perfect

Part 1: The Rule of Three
Part 2: Improve Your Speech Writing with The Rule of Three
Part 3: The Three Question Rule

OKAY, you may be thinking, what’s so special about the number 3?

Good question.

The “Rule of Three” is the name given to that magical law of nature whereby things that come in threes appear to be just right. In ancient times, the Roman’s understood this rule and referred to it with the Latin maxim “omne trium perfectum” which means “everything that comes in threes is perfect”. And today we have English sayings such as “third time lucky” and “third time’s a charm”, which seem to reflect the same idea.

Information presented in groups of three will stick in the head of your audience better than any other grouping of information. Why is this? The most plausible explanation is that since people are generally good at pattern recognition and three is the smallest number of points required to create a pattern, information presented in threes forms a pattern which can be more easily remembered. As a result, information presented in a group of three is more memorable that information presented in groups of say, two or five.

The US Marines believe in the Rule of Three, and use it to structure their organisation and ensure that everyone’s job remains manageable. “In a nutshell, the rule is this: each marine has three things to worry about. In terms of organizational structure, the “rule of three” means a corporal has a three-person fire team; a sergeant has a squad of three fire teams; a lieutenant and a staff sergeant have a platoon of three squads; and so on, up to generals.” (Inc.com).

There is something magical about the number three.

Who is responsible for your success?

THIS IS an important question because the answer will affect how you feel about yourself, how likely you are to persist in the face of set backs, and how much enjoyment you gain from the things you do.

If you have read any of Seth Godin‘s work then you are probably familiar with the idea of the “linchpin”; the person who makes things happen, gets things done, and is the reason for successful outcomes.

Who are the linchpins in your world?  Think about your work life, family life, or sporting activities.  Who do you want on your team?  Who is the person that will ensure quality work, home cooked meals, or sporting victory?  Chances are you can think of at least one person in each setting who you would describe as a “linchpin” … and chances are they’re not you.

Many people look externally for the source of positive outcomes, success and enjoyment in their lives.  Martin Seligman, in his best-selling book “Learned Optimism“, outlines that this habit of attributing positive outcomes to other people, external factors or luck is a form of pessimism.  And the more non-personal, temporary and specific your explanations for positive outcomes, the more pronounced the pessimism.

Here are three examples of pessimistic explanations for positive outcomes:

  1. Praise from a client: “The client was happy with the finance report [specific] that the team [non-personal] submitted on this project [temporary]. Dave had some great insights.” [non-personal]
  2. Enjoyed family barbeque: “I enjoyed the family barbeque [specific] this year [temporary]. Grandma was so funny.” [non-personal]
  3. Won a swimming race: “I won the race [specific]. Suzy was off the pace tonight.” [non-personal and temporary]

You need to take personal responsibility for the good things in your life because this is a form of optimism, self-belief, and will give you the positive energy you need to keep moving.  The more personal, permanent, and pervasive your explanations for your success, the better.

Compare the above explanations with the following more optimistic explanations:

  1. Praise from client: “The client loves us [permanent, pervasive]. We are a good group and I work really well with people.” [personal, permanent]
  2. Enjoyed family barbeque: “What a fun day with the family, I always enjoy myself.” [personal, permanent and pervasive]
  3. Won a swimming race: “The other swimmers are very competitive [permanent]. I swam a personal best [personal] and I am grateful to my coach for helping me make the most of my abilities.” [personal, permanent and pervasive]

The interesting thing about each of the above statements is that they explain things which have happened, i.e. they explain the past.  It is curious that many people find it difficult to explain the past in an optimistic way because, after all, your life is a story, you are the main character, and you are free to tell your own story and portray the the main character in any way you choose.  If you do not own your past successes then you are placing other people or circumstances at the the centre of your personal story, and thereby shifting positive energy away from yourself.

Wait a minute, you may be thinking, taking all the credit for my success sounds kind of arrogant and being humble is a good thing, right?  Yes, you are right, humility is a good thing.  However, if you think of “humility” as the quality of avoiding excessive arrogance and considering other people as just as important as yourself then you might agree that failing to take responsibility goes much further than this.  The humble man will give credit where credit is due, but the irresponsible man will almost always downplay or ignore his own role in success and attribute that success to other people, fortunate circumstances or dumb luck.

The irresponsible man may be able to avoid any blame for failure. However, he will find it difficult to be satisfied with his success, persist in the face of personal setbacks, or delight in fulfilling his daily goals … because he has none.

Who is responsible for your success?

Free Money Day

TOMORROW, SEPTEMBER 15th, at various public locations worldwide, people will hand out their own money to complete strangers, two coins or notes at a time, asking the recipients to pass one of these coins or notes on to someone else.

The aim is to raise awareness and start conversations about the benefits of economies based on sharing, as well as offer a liberating experience that gets us thinking more critically and creatively about our relationship with money and how we could have new types of economic activity. Free Money Day is an initiative of the Post Growth Institute, an international group seeking to inspire and equip people everywhere to explore paths to global prosperity that don’t rely on economic growth.

To learn more, and to participate, click here.

Note: The Post Growth Institute is a catalyst for identifying, inspiring and implementing new approaches to global well-being. Its mission is to build and empower a broad-based global movement dedicated to bringing about futures beyond economic growth.