What Is Blockchain? A Beginner’s Guide

The year 2017, for everything else it may or may not be, is already heralded as “The Year of Blockchain.” But what exactly is “blockchain” – and why is it slated to be the debutante of the ball across multiple industries?

Essentially blockchain is a way of connecting distributed databases to each other. In other words, it connects databases on machines that are not otherwise connected to each other in one firm or location. Further, it is also a way for these databases to “talk” to each other – to issue and receive commands and data in both encrypted and hashed form to accomplish functions or tasks. Blockchain is, in effect, a new kind of database, which writes “ledger entries” in different locations, but which can then be accessed by the network of computers to confirm that transactions did occur and reconcile these transactions.

It creates what is widely known as a “trustless” network – in other words, it removes the need for trusted third parties like banks or financial institutions to “enter” or reconcile entries, however this is a bit of a misnomer. The role that was formerly played by trusted third parties is now being played by the blockchain network itself. The “trust” that is implied is that the network is stable and the code – or protocols – of the network can in fact function as they are intended to. While blockchain may remove the need for trusted third party institutions, some of the newer blockchains (including Ripple) are based on the idea of “trusted” or “authorized” parties transferring data to one another. This allows a preselected group of “trusted parties” – in this case banks – to lower transactions costs, reduce the chance of fraud and remain competitive while creating in effect a private network.

The most revolutionary aspect of blockchain is that it moves the role of verification (of a task, payment or other action) from a single entity (such as a government or corporation) to multiple computers along its network. While a government or corporate entity (or even single person with enough wealth and power) could conceivably buy the majority of Bitcoins on the Bitcoin network and then hire programmers to change the rules of the network according to its own mandate, this is currently seen as a remote possibility.

The medium of exchange in the world of blockchain is cryptocurrency – tokens that have some value determined either by (a) direct market forces as in the case of Bitcoin or Ether, or (b) by the cost of the computing power required to produce them – in which case they is known as either a “tokens” or “altcoins”.

The workhorse of blockchain is the “smart contract” – which is just another way of saying that after a token has been “paid” for a particular purpose, then a certain action or transaction is triggered. For example, if Jane wants to send Bob five Bitcoins, she can utilize the Bitcoin network to do so (as long as she and Bob both have “wallets” connected to the network) and further, a record of that transaction will be recorded in all the computers in the network. If Jane is expecting to receive, in exchange for those five Bitcoins, ten shares of Bob’s company stock, he will be required to send her the digital token assuring her that the shares have been transferred to her before he can accept the five Bitcoins.

According to Nick Szabo, a cryptographer and “father” of smart contracts, an idea which he explored in a paper published in 1998, smart contracts are “a set of promises agreed to in a meeting of the minds [which] is the traditional way to formalize a relationship.”

Said another way, smart contracts work within the protocols (or algorithms) created to link the chain of databases together, to execute how such computers communicate with each other.

There are many different use cases for this kind of technology – although it has made its first impact in the world of finance. According to the Chamber of Digital Commerce, which has just published a report “Smart Contracts: 12 Use Cases for Business and Beyond” the industries (beyond finance) which are likely to see rapid deployment of the technology in the near future range from a further development of the concept in the financial industry to insurance and the healthcare industry.

What deployment of blockchain technology really means in the immediate future, is that the world will become more interconnected, that manual processes in many industries will be automated, and that the “costs” associated with these transactions will fall dramatically.

That said, it is far too early to predict what the adoption of blockchain will accomplish – just as it was essentially impossible to see where and how the Internet would change the nature of communication and community.

Suffice it to say, however, that by 2020, the world will already be a very different place because of blockchain’s deployment. By 2025, according to top consultants like Deloitte [pdf], the banking industry (at a minimum) will be profoundly disrupted.

Marguerite Arnold is an entrepreneur, author and third semester EMBA candidate at the Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.

How to turn down work without compromising your position

When was the last time you said ‘no’ at work? There’s no shame in being the guy who says ‘yes’: taking on work indiscriminately is the sign of a healthy work ethic – but whether it’s a productive work ethic or not is another matter. And, unfortunately, the willingness to take on every task you’re assigned can sometimes be caught up in other, less positive attributes: fear of losing out, pride in handling everything that’s thrown at you, or simply the inability to assess and manage your own schedule.

If you take on tasks that you don’t have time to complete, or that will impact negatively on the rest of your workload, you are not just letting yourself in for a hard time – you are compromising the level of what you can achieve for your business, your boss and/or your client. If you decide to turn a project down, saying ‘no’ can be the most difficult part. If you fear the wrath of the person to whom you’re declining, try to remain confident in the knowledge that ultimately it’s the best solution for everyone.

Therefore, transparency is the best way to proceed. Take some time to clarify for yourself the reasons that you can’t take the work on, and potential solutions. Be bold and honest, and you will retain their understanding and respect. This isn’t the moment for excuses, but for reason. Meet them in person (rather than sending an email) – you can ensure you’ve been understood properly and it will be easier to make your point.

If you’re working as part of a team or community, you may know someone who is better suited to take the work on. Again, this may be what throws you in a quandary about whether to turn the work down: perhaps you’re concerned that redirecting work on one occasion may see you overlooked next time around. It’s a legitimate fear, but ask yourself: is it better to suck it up and submit inferior work, or to offer a better solution that keeps everyone happy? Pass along a tasty assignment, and you should be remembered positively by client and colleague alike: you will position yourself as a helpful and resourceful part of the ecosystem. It all comes back around eventually.

On the other hand, if you’re passing on a less savory task and you’re concerned your boss will think you’re shirking, face up to the music and ask for help. Arrange a meeting to discuss your schedule. Use the opportunity to discuss the implications of overwork and to try to solve the issue together: maybe you need more overtime, more workable deadlines, or perhaps some help prioritizing and scheduling. Approached with honesty and maturity, hopefully your boss should see sense.

If transparency is the foundation of this approach, gratitude is an element not to overlook. Whether you’re saying no to an appealing bit of business, or asserting yourself regarding your employer’s unrealistic expectations, these are the people that pay your salary. Expressing thanks at having been considered for the task is a valuable way of maintaining relations even as you’re forced to turn it down. A client should be thanked for the potential business and asked to remember you next time; a boss can be thanked for considering your talents to be suitable to the job at hand – and for having confidence in you to complete such a heavy workload! So finally, when you’ve met with the person, explained your position and offered alternatives, remember to say thank you. After all, having too much work can be a privilege that others would love to have.

These ideas and more are collected in a new infographic from The Business Backer. Be sure to read and digest them next time you’re unsure how to deal with a request too far.

This is a guest post from John Cole. John is a digital nomad and freelance writer. Specialising in leadership, digital media and personal growth, his passions include world cinema and biscuits. A native Englishman, he is always on the move, but can most commonly be spotted in Norway, the UK and the Balkans.

(Image Source: The Business Backer)

Travel, Training and Mentorship

Travel, Training and Mentorship

Three significant aspects in the life of a management consultant: travel, training and mentorship.

Travel

When it comes to travel, different consulting firms have different policies. McKinsey consultants often spend Monday to Thursday at the client site with Fridays in the office. Bain and BCG often spend a lot of time with the client at the beginning and end of the project but less time in between.

Training

Consultants are the primary asset of a consulting firm, and top consulting firms invest a considerable amount on formal training and development programs.

Consultants may spend as much as eight weeks per year attending formal training sessions and conferences.

Since university courses are often overly theoretical and academic, the focus on training and development can serve as an invaluable bridge into the corporate world. This can lay a solid foundation for a career in the consulting industry, as well as open up attractive exit opportunities.

Mentorship

Consulting firms will typically assign new recruits with a formal mentor.

A mentor is responsible for overseeing professional development and can be an invaluable source of career guidance, an advocate to help you get staffed on projects and a person to champion your promotion within the firm.

In addition to having a formal mentor, junior consultants should also develop relationships with consultants throughout the firm, particularly with people who share a common area of interest or with whom they have developed a good rapport.

[For more information on the management consulting industry, download our “Guide to Management Consulting“.]

(Image Source: Flickr)

The Far Reaching Impact of Blockchain

Blockchain, the underlying technology used by Bitcoin, has implications that reach far beyond the financial services community and banks. This is where new development and implementation may have focussed so far. However, as the technology and its implications become better understood, it will rapidly expand to new industries and verticals.

Blockchain systems operate as a kind of distributed database that store immutable (that is, non-changeable and verifiable) transactional records stored as “blocks” of information. Each block contains a timestamp and is linked or referenceable to a previous block and hence forms part of a larger “block chain”. Blockchains can either be public, private, or a combination of the two, with information accessible to users via “keys”.

Blockchain also works very much like a large distributed, non-centralized network. Each “node” of the network is a processor (or computer server in other words) that stores each block of information processed by that node. Once processed or verified, a transaction record can then be shared with other nodes in the network. This could be anyone in the case of a public blockchain, or only authorized users in the case of a private blockchain.

Blockchain technology has been applied in the finance industry in the payments space. Ripple, for example, allows banks to transact between themselves and with individuals globally by creating a payment platform that allows banks to settle payments in different currencies in real time. Individual payments and currency settlement calculations are made by a decentralized network of processors located at the banks and clients all over the world using Ripple’s payment protocol.

However the technology has many other uses – starting with the ability to better monetize alternative energy to the digitisation of insurance contracts. The insurance industry, in particular, is starting to get serious about investigating, if not yet implementing, blockchain solutions in order to streamline paperwork, manage supply chain issues if not insurance contracts overall, accelerate the processing of insurance claims, and improve the auditability of transaction records.

In fact, the real juice behind blockchain is not bits and bytes, but in fact how events are triggered by electronic code that translates contractual relationships into action – or so-called “smart contracts” that are executed within blockchain networks.

Smart contracts – or the computer protocols that facilitate, verify and enforce agreements – are actually the heart of this revolution. They represent a unique blending of technology and law, usually with regard to payments – but not limited to them. Smart contracts are actually coded binary language triggers along the network that cause certain things to happen when specific conditions are met. For example, Customer A authorizes payment to buy a convertible bond. When market conditions warrant, the bond “smart contract” will then automatically pay Customer A the required coupon payment, convert the bond into a certain pre-determined number of shares, or take some other required action.

Despite the hype, however, there are still vast unknowns – namely the ability of coders to accurately translate legal requirements into transactions that can be understood and retranslated by people – starting with regulators. In terms of payment or other easily defined contractual obligations (such as trade confirmations), the concepts are relatively straightforward. However, as anyone who has looked at even the simplest contract knows, there are many parts of a contract that are not easy to translate into code from natural language – much less decipher downstream. This includes everything from indemnities, warranties, covenants, confidentiality, digital signatures and enforceability if not other pieces in between.

What happens, for example, when the convertible bond bought by Customer A does not react to the right market conditions? Or what happens if the electronic triggers in the smart contract for this convertible bond are activated by the wrong set of market conditions? How will lawyers without coding experience be able to catch such errors? And how will coders without a legal background know what to look for to find them?

While understanding whether payment has been made (for example) is relatively easy to understand by all parties, understanding whether a service has been correctly provided, particularly when translated into and out of digital code, represents a quagmire that is already coming – and with no easy answers.

The legal enforceability of at least part of what smart contracts represent is not far away. Payment and exchange of services or data is the easy part. Redefinition of contractual relationships, however, is where the entire conversation starts to get murky. That is nowhere more obvious when applied to a specific part of “contract” law – namely civil rights.

For those who do not believe that civil rights are in fact a contractual relationship relating to basic property rights (including payment), values, and perhaps even the meaning of citizenship itself, then look no further than perhaps one of the most overlooked parts of civil rights and contract law in the United States.

The Civil Rights Act of 1991, also known as 42 U.S. Code §1981, is a United States labour law and the most recent codification of civil rights in America. In effect, it equates the contractual value of minorities and people with disabilities with that of white men.

In other words, civil rights are the mandatory equalizing of the contractual value of individuals enforced by the state. But that state is only one country.

What happens if there is a contract, for example, between an English multinational and an American citizen for work being performed in Hong Kong?

Do American civil rights laws apply?

Which set of laws should govern a smart contract?

If smart contracts expressly choose New York law, for example, this could mean that the best of American labor and civil rights laws are automatically exported to other countries. But it could also mean that contractual inadequacies, due to a failure to expressly choose a governing law, lead to unexpected results and ultimately undermine basic notions of equality and civil rights.

Further, what is the appropriate forum for resolving disputes under a smart contract?

In a world where contracts that affect payments as well as the terms of employment are becoming increasingly undecipherable, will smart contracts, which can also be used to govern labour agreements, be literally rewritten to eviscerate the concept of equal pay, access to healthcare, and perhaps even the right to negotiate a contract in the first place? And if smart contracts hide or distort important contract terms, how will consumers actually be able to tell if they have gotten what they paid for?

These are some of the big issues which face the entire discussion around blockchain. They are not widely part of the vernacular so far. However, just as bitcoins are electronic “digital currency”, block chain, the master regulator of such systems, could easily become a place where the contractual elements of pay, consumer and civil rights are either enshrined, or eviscerated.

Marguerite Arnold is an entrepreneur, author and third semester EMBA candidate at the Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.

Celebrate, Motivate, Get Passionate

Three ideas for the new year.

1. Plan a Celebration

It is common at the turn of a new year to set “resolutions” for things you want to do, change, or achieve in your life.

The problem with new year’s resolutions is that, if they had been really important to you, you would have set them earlier without needing the new year as a prompt.

Achieving goals is more important than writing wish lists.

Instead of making a resolution, make a plan for a celebration you plan to have after your goal is achieved.

As Tom Peters has said, “celebrate what you want to see more of.”

2. Motivate Others

Zig Ziglar once said “people often say that motivation doesn’t last. Well, neither does bathing – that’s why we recommend it daily.”

It can sometimes be hard to find motivation because working towards a meaningful long term goal requires short term effort. Delayed gratification is not easy.

One way to increase your motivation is to try and motivate your family, friends and colleagues. Some of your positive energy will rub off on you.

A second reason to motivate others is that there is a limit to what you can achieve by yourself. In the long run, your success will be limited unless you can motivate and inspire other people to work with you and for you.

3. Get Passionate About A New Idea

Life is a wonderful journey.

Find a new idea, person or project to be passionate about, and set aside some time for your new passion each week.

There is no limit to what you can learn. However, for many people (especially if you are in the corporate world) their job requires them to carry out routine tasks which sap their energy or bore them half to death.

“The mind is not a vessel that needs filling, but wood that needs igniting.” (Plutarch)

Find something new to get excited about.