Travel, Training and Mentorship

Travel, Training and Mentorship

Three significant aspects in the life of a management consultant: travel, training and mentorship.

Travel

When it comes to travel, different consulting firms have different policies. McKinsey consultants often spend Monday to Thursday at the client site with Fridays in the office. Bain and BCG often spend a lot of time with the client at the beginning and end of the project but less time in between.

Training

Consultants are the primary asset of a consulting firm, and top consulting firms invest a considerable amount on formal training and development programs.

Consultants may spend as much as eight weeks per year attending formal training sessions and conferences.

Since university courses are often overly theoretical and academic, the focus on training and development can serve as an invaluable bridge into the corporate world. This can lay a solid foundation for a career in the consulting industry, as well as open up attractive exit opportunities.

Mentorship

Consulting firms will typically assign new recruits with a formal mentor.

A mentor is responsible for overseeing professional development and can be an invaluable source of career guidance, an advocate to help you get staffed on projects and a person to champion your promotion within the firm.

In addition to having a formal mentor, junior consultants should also develop relationships with consultants throughout the firm, particularly with people who share a common area of interest or with whom they have developed a good rapport.

[For more information on the management consulting industry, download our “Guide to Management Consulting“.]

(Image Source: Flickr)

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